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Tikun Hatzor and Selichot, 1906 (Baghdad)

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parentsIraqi Jewish collection

1906 BAGHDAD IRAQ PRINTING, PRINTED BY DANGOOR
HEBREW
VG CONDITION, HARDCOVER
סדר תקון חצות וסליחות / מסודר ... עפ"י רבינו האר"י עם הדינים הנחוצים ...
ק'ו'י'נ'ו' ל'ו' ו'י'ו'ש'י'ע'נ'ו' תרס"ו
בגדאד : דפוס עזרא דנגור

ד הד' האחרונים כוללים: סדר התרת נדרים וקללות.

SCARCE EDITION OF AN IMPORTANT KABBALA LITURGY, BASED ON THE WRITINGS OF THE ARI ZAL
Tikun Hazot (lit. “institution of midnight [prayer]”), prayers recited at midnight in memory of destruction of the Temple and for the restoration to the Land of Israel. This custom developed from the rabbinic description of God mourning the destruction. It is recorded that during the night He "sits and roars like a lion, exclaiming: 'Woe to the children, on account of whose sins I destroyed My house and burnt My temple and exiled them among the nations of the world'" (Ber. 3a). The hour of midnight was chosen because David arose at this hour to study and pray, as it is said, "At midnight I will rise to give thanks unto Thee" (Ps. 119:62; Ber. 3b–4a). This practice became formalized under the influence of the Kabbalah during the period of R. Isaac Luria . Two separate forms of the service developed known as Tikkun Ra?el and Tikkun Le'ah. Tikkun Ra?el, consisting of Psalms 137 and 79 and Tehinnot on the destruction of the Temple, is recited on days when Tahanun is said. On the Sabbath, festivals, and days when Ta?anun is omitted, Tikkun Le'ah, consisting of more joyful psalms, such as 111 and 126, and selections from the Mishnah (Tamid ch. 1), is recited.